37,000,000
ESTIMATED AMERICANS
LIVING WITH A DISABILITY

The estimate ranges from 37 million to 57 million people in the United States.

GENERAL DISABILITY FACTS

  • Approximately 22% of American adults have a disability. This includes disabilities relating to vision impairment or blindness, hearing impairment, physical movement or mobility, cognition, memory, learning, communication, behavior and mental health.
  • In Missouri, about 24% of adults have a disability.
  • The chance of having a disability goes up with age, from less than 10% for people 15 years of age or younger, to almost 75% for people 80 years of age or older.
  • In 2006, disability-associated health care expenditures accounted for 26.7% of all health care expenditures for adults residing in the United States and totaled $397.8 billion.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Disability and Health website

For more information on disabilities, visit the CDC website.

1,700,000
TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURIES
PER YEAR IN THE U.S.

That's one every 18 seconds.

TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY (TBI)

  • Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) make up about 5.5% of all injuries reported in the United States.  TBIs comprise 4.8% of all injuries seen in emergency department visits and 15.1% of all hospitalizations. Of all the injury-related deaths in the United States, TBI was a contributing factor 30.5% of the time.
  • Percentage of annual TBI by cause: Falls are the leading cause at 35.2%, 17.3% are from motor vehicle–traffic injuries, 16.5% are the result a strike to the head, 10% are caused by assualts and 21% are due to other/unknown causes.
  • Rates TBI from falls are highest among children aged 0 to 4 and adults aged 75 and older.
  • Rates of TBI are higher among men than among women, across every age group.
  • About 75% of TBIs that occur each year are concussions or other forms of mild traumatic brain injury.

Source: Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States: Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths. Atlanta (GA): Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; 2010.

For more information on traumatic brain injury, visit the CDC website or the Brain Injury Association (BIA) website.

920,000
ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURIES
PER YEAR IN THE U.S.

That's one every 2 minutes.

ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY (ABI)

  • Acquired brain injuries (ABI) are impairments as the result of a nontraumatic injury to the brain such as stroke, brain tumors, brain infection or poisoning, loss of oxygen to the brain and other non-congenital brain illnesses or disorders. (Neurodegenerative brain conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease, are not considered ABI.)
3,500,000
AMERICANS LIVING WITH AN
AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER

About one in every 68 children born will be diagnosed with an ASD.

AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER (ASD)

  • ASD is about 4.5 times more common among boys (1 in 42) than among girls (1 in 189).
  • ASD is reported to occur in all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups.
  • Even though ASD can be diagnosed as early as age 2, most children are not diagnosed until after age 4 years. The median age of first diagnosis by subtype is as follows: autistic disorder – 3 years, 10 months; pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) – 4 years, 1 month; Asperger disorder – 6 years, 2 months.
  • Almost half (about 44%) of children identified with ASD has average to above average intellectual ability.
  • ASD commonly co-occurs with other developmental, psychiatric, neurologic, chromosomal, and genetic diagnoses.
  • Scientists believe that both genetics and environment likely play a role in ASD.
  • While there is no cure for ASD, therapies and behavioral interventions can remedy specific symptoms and can substantially improve those symptoms. Medications can help some people with ASD function better and treat symptoms.

Source: Community Report from the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network. Atlanta (GA): Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities; 2016.

For more information on autism spectrum disorders, visit the CDC website, the Autism Speaks website or the Autism Society website.